Gigantic

Gigantic Review

Gigantic, by Motiga, is a unique take on the MOBA genre, offering players the chance to take place in a battle for dominance between two colossal creatures from a third-person shooter perspective. While it’s missing some expected features and it feels lacking in content, it’s an entertaining experience that’s sure to please newcomers and veterans of the genre alike.

Gigantic

Developed by Motiga / Published by Perfect World

Available on the PC and Xbox One. Reviewed on the PC.

*Review code provided by Motiga

In Gigantic, players fight in various colorful, cartoonish arenas in order to support a large guardian as they face off against another. The overall goal is to defeat the rival team’s guardian, and in order to do so players must collect one hundred points of power in order to have their guardians attack the other and expose their wound. This is done by defeating rival heroes, collecting power from control points known as Power Circles spread throughout the map, as well as killing monsters that can be summoned to protect control points. Once the required power points are gathered, a guardian makes its way over to the opposite side of the map to attack and exposes the rival’s weak point to blows from heroes. The team who gets three wounds on the enemy guardian wins the match.

The rules are simple enough for players to jump straight in and start aiding their Guardian in defeating the rival, but there’s also some depth to the whole experience. There are different character types such as shooters, fighters, tanks and summoners, each offering the MOBA-like experience with a main attack and three special abilities with cooldowns and upgrade trees allowing for further customization and strategy. Then there’s the summonable creatures that occupy control points, which players start with a standard selection of three: a plant that heals, a cyclops that blocks paths with walls, and a cerebus who reveals nearby enemy positions. Players can upgrade them to stronger versions in exchange for Focus Charges – a chargeable meter which can also be used as a powerful, ultimate ability, making them tougher to take down and grant the rival team points. As players progress and earn in-game money, they can purchase even more options to add even more defensive measures and keep things surprising for the enemy.

Gigantic’s combat is very fun.

The gameplay is fast, flashy and action-packed, tactical and most importantly, very fun. The overall back and forth of combat as players rush across the map and fight for control points and kills is pulse pounding as players race to collect power before the rival team, and strategic, team-based play is rewarded as often rushing in ahead unprepared can quickly lead to doom. The third-person shooter gameplay also breaks away from the MOBA norm, allowing players to approach enemies from the ground and air for some dynamic, action-packed combat that’ll instantly feel right at home for players coming from the shooter genre. Matches are usually also quick paced and short, so players won’t have to slog through long slugfests if they are short on time.

The wide variety of fantastically designed and cartoonish characters are all very enjoyable to use and feel very different from each other with their unique abilities, offering players quite a few options and strategies on how to tackle foes from close up or far away, with melee attacks, guns, and magic. The controls are excellent as well, and are very responsive as players run around stages and shoot or attack enemies, collect power and summon creatures. Selecting from the upgrade tree while in combat is a bit tricky, as it obscures the screen while the options are chosen, but once players are familiar with them it becomes a breeze.

When the guardians clash, the map changes, forming a new arena to fight in.

When it comes to gameplay modes, the game feels a little light. For now, the game only has three options: practice, co-op versus A.I., and Gigantic (normal 5v5), which means that players will mostly stick to one after familiarizing themselves with the game. A couple of different gameplay modes would have been nice – like an arena or ranked match, but the game just came out so it’s understandable. Hopefully they’ll be introduced in future updates.

The game does come with some standard MOBA quirks, like unlockable skins for characters and weapons. Then there’s also challenges in the form of fortune cards that when completed, reward players with even more experience and money, rewarding constant play.

While the game is great so far, it does have some issues. Among the missing elements is the ability to report players who abandon games or are AFK, which allows them to skip games without any punishment. I’ve had quite a few games where players just left mid-match, and there was no way to penalize them for it. Then there’s the mini-map, which isn’t very detailed when it comes to the layout of a stage. While it does its job at showing players where power circles are and where heroes are, it doesn’t really show all the different paths one can take, so players do have to learn maps in order to be able to navigate them successfully, or risk running in circles losing precious time getting to an exposed guardian or vulnerable creature.

At the end of the day, Motiga’s Gigantic is a fantastic spin on the MOBA genre, offering fantastic free-to-play team-based action on the PC and Xbox One. While it’s lacking in some areas, like gameplay options and some standard features, it’s an excellent offering that will only get better with time. Check it out.

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Alexandro Rios

Editor-in-Chief at Glitch Cat
Alexandro is the Editor-in-chief of glitchcat.com. He quietly weeps daily for the loss of Silent Hills. Rest in peace, awesome horror game. Add him on PSN/XBLA: glitchbot012